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Google Doodle Designs by Priyanka ,  Feb 14, 2013

The Google Doodle is an artistic version of the Google logo.[1] Google Doodles represent events like holidays, anniversaries, or current events. Some of the doodles were limited to Google's country specific home pages while others appeared globally.[2]

Google had posted about 260 doodles in the year 2011.[2] In 2012, Google continued its trend to doodle on the occasion of New Year. The New Year doodle, infact was a continuation of the Google Doodle featured on December 31, 2011. Also there was an increase in the number of doodles presented this year, which included a series of doodles dedicated to 2012 London Olympics. 2012 also saw many innovative and interactive doodles featured on the main page. One of those was a zipper doodle, to celebrate 132nd birthday of Gideon Sundback, inventor of the practical version of the zipper.

From time to time, Google introduces humorous or artistic modifications in the company's logo to commemorate holidays, anniversaries or major events. These modified logos are called doodles.Doodles on the Google homepage have become highly popular, making the search on Google more fun and enjoyable for its users. Over the years, Google Doodles have become increasingly complex, transforming Google's logo into video or making it interactive. More than 1000 googles have been created worldwide, some of them had been only seen in specific countries. You can see the complete doodles collection here.

Doodles are the fun, surprising, and sometimes spontaneous changes that are made to the Google logo to celebrate holidays, anniversaries, and the lives of famous artists, pioneers, and scientists.

How did the idea for doodles originate?

In 1998, before the company was even incorporated, the concept of the doodle was born when Google founders Larry and Sergey played with the corporate logo to indicate their attendance at the Burning Man festival in the Nevada desert. They placed a stick figure drawing behind the 2nd "o" in the word, Google, and the revised logo was intended as a comical message to Google users that the founders were "out of office." While the first doodle was relatively simple, the idea of decorating the company logo to celebrate notable events was born.

Two years later in 2000, Larry and Sergey asked current webmaster Dennis Hwang, an intern at the time, to produce a doodle for Bastille Day. It was so well received by our users that Dennis was appointed Google's chief doodler and doodles started showing up more and more regularly on the Google homepage. In the beginning, the doodles mostly celebrated familiar holidays; nowadays, they highlight a wide array of events and anniversaries from the Birthday of John James Audubon to the Ice Cream Sundae.

Over time, the demand for doodles has risen in the U.S. and internationally. Creating doodles is now the responsibility of a team of talented illlustrators (we call them doodlers) and engineers. For them, creating doodles has become a group effort to enliven the Google homepage and bring smiles to the faces of Google users around the world.

How many doodles has Google done over the years?

The team has created over 1000 doodles for our homepages around the world.

Who chooses what doodles will be created and how do you decide which events will receive doodles?

A group of Googlers get together regularly to brainstorm and decide which events will be celebrated with a doodle. The ideas for the doodles come from numerous sources including Googlers and Google users. The doodle selection process aims to celebrate interesting events and anniversaries that reflect Google's personality and love for innovation.

Who designs the doodles?

There is a team of illustrators (we call them doodlers) and engineers that are behind each and every doodle you see.

How can Google users/the public submit ideas for doodles?

The doodle team is always excited to hear ideas from users - they can email proposals@google.com with ideas for the next Google doodle. The team receives hundreds of requests every day so we unfortunately can't respond to everyone. But rest assured that we're reading them :)

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